FILE - Zimbabwe's president, Emmerson Mnangagwa, at the BRICS Summit at the Sandton Convention Centre in Gauteng.Itumeleng English/African News Agency (ANA)
FILE - Zimbabwe's president, Emmerson Mnangagwa, at the BRICS Summit at the Sandton Convention Centre in Gauteng.Itumeleng English/African News Agency (ANA)
FILE. MDC Alliance leader Nelson Chamisa addresses a press conference in the capital Harare on Wednesday. To his left is MDC Alliance co-partner Tendai Biti. PHOTO: ANA Reporter
FILE. MDC Alliance leader Nelson Chamisa addresses a press conference in the capital Harare on Wednesday. To his left is MDC Alliance co-partner Tendai Biti. PHOTO: ANA Reporter

The United States says it will continue to review data collected by its own observation teams, other international missions, and local observers before it can make a complete assessment of the disputed Zimbabwe election.

The MDC Alliance led by 40-year-old Nelson Chamisa is disputing the outcome of the polls alleging that they were rigged to the point of having more votes than registered voters.

While the winner, ZANU PF leader and incumbent president, Emmerson Mnangagwa, 75, acknowledged that there were "challenges" he insisted the polls were free and fair.

The US Department of State said Zimbabwe’s 30 July elections presented the country with a historic chance to move beyond the political and economic crises of the past and toward profound democratic change.

“Unfortunately, Zimbabwe’s success in delivering an election day that was peaceful, and open to international observers, was subsequently marred by violence and a disproportionate use of deadly force against protestors by the security forces,” the department’s spokesperson Heather Nauert said in a statement.

Six people were shot dead on Wednesday by soldiers and many others were injured. A seventh person is reported to have succumbed to gunshot wounds on Friday at a hospital in Chitungwiza.

The US said it welcomes the commitment by Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (ZEC) to release comprehensive election results in a form that provides full transparency. ZEC maintains that the election results were an accurate reflection of the voters' will. 

Former colonial master, Britain, also remained concerned about the developments.

“The UK remains deeply concerned by the violence following the elections and the disproportionate response from the security forces,” said UK Minister of State for Africa, Harriett Baldwin. 

She, however, urged electoral stakeholders to work together to ensure calm.

“While polling day passed off peacefully, a number of concerns have been raised by observer missions, particularly about the pre-election environment, the role of State media, and the use of State resources. There is much to be done to build confidence in Zimbabwe’s electoral process.”

Baldwin urged that any appeals against the results or the process be handled swiftly and impartially.

- African News Agency (ANA)